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Vitamin D-3 could ‘reverse’ damage to heart

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By probing the effect that vitamin D-3 has on the cells that make up the lining of blood vessels, scientists at Ohio University in Athens, OH, have identified for the first time the role that the “sunshine vitamin” plays in preserving cardiovascular health. In a paper published in the International Journal of Nanomedicine, they describe how they used nanosensors and a cell model to identify the molecular mechanisms that vitamin D-3 can trigger in the endothelium, which is the thin layer of tissue that lines blood vessels. It was previously believed that the endothelium served no other purpose than to act as an inert “wrapper” of the vascular system, allowing both water and electrolytes to pass in and out of the bloodstream. However, advances over the past 30 years have revealed that the endothelium acts more like an organ that lines the whole of the circulatory system from the “heart to the smallest capillaries,” and whose cells carry out many unique biological functions. Changes to …

Blood transfusion during surgery boosts risk of venous thromboembolism

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Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions during surgery are associated with double the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) over the ensuing 30 days, researchers reported in JAMA Surgery. Investigators analyzed more than 750,000 patients undergoing surgery from a registry containing 525 North American hospitals. A total of 6.3 percent of the patients received perioperative RBC transfusions, defined as a transfusion from 72 hours before to 72 hours after surgery. These patients experienced VTE at a rate 2.1 times higher than those who didn’t undergo transfusions, even after adjustment for patient characteristics, surgical complexity and hospital length of stay. However, only 0.8 percent of patients in the study experienced postoperative VTE, a combination of pulmonary embolism and deep vein thrombosis. “Transfused RBCs have been proposed to modulate the inflammatory cascade,” wrote lead author Ruchika Goel, MD, MPH, with New York Presbyterian Hospital and Weill Cornell Medicine, and colleagu…

Peripheral Vascular Disease dangerous for the heart

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Peripheral Vascular Disease is a serious condition that often reveals itself through pain in the legs or other extremities. Often called Peripheral Artery Disease or Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD), it is the result of arteriosclerosis or restricted blood flow caused by a buildup of plaque on the inner walls of the arteries. When the flow of blood is limited, limbs, the heart and brain are deprived of the oxygen. Additionally, muscle cells in the wall of the artery overgrow and fat and calcium build up within these irregular spaces. Bleeding into the artery wall can also occur resulting in formation of a clot, which narrows the opening of the blood vessel even further.

Doctors found the unexpected cause of vascular diseases

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A group of Danish scientists-cardiologists from the University of Copenhagen came to the conclusion that the likelihood of early death from problems with the blood vessels for men is doubled if they lead a solitary existence. The results of their study they presented at the EuroHeartCare Congress in 2018 in Dublin. Many experts believe that loneliness in terms of the risk of such illnesses as coronary heart disease and stroke even more dangerous in its effects than obesity. Danish researchers have added to this conclusion that loneliness can also increase the likelihood of other cardiac disorders such as ischemia, atrial fibrillation. Preliminary research, incidentally, also showed that loneliness can be a factor of premature death. Data showed: people without relatives, family and loved ones often die several years earlier than their peers, sharing your life with someone else. “Loneliness and at the same time affects the health in itself, and leads to the fact that elderly and sick …

Elevated Blood Pressure at Age 50 Tied to Dementia Later

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Blood pressure in midlife that was higher than normal — but below the threshold used to treat hypertension in some countries — was linked to increased risk of developing dementia later in life, an analysis of the long-running Whitehall II study found. Men and women who had a systolic blood pressure ≥130 mm Hg at age 50 had a 45% greater risk of developing dementia than people with a lower systolic blood pressure at the same age, reported Archana Singh-Manoux, PhD, of the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research (INSERM) in Paris, and colleagues in European Heart Journal. This association was not seen at ages 60 or 70. “Our analysis suggests that the importance of midlife hypertension on brain health is due to the duration of exposure,” Singh-Manoux said in a statement. “So we see an increased risk for people with raised blood pressure at age 50, but not 60 or 70, because those with hypertension at age 50 are likely to be exposed to this risk for longer.” The American …

5EU Surgical Cardiovascular and Peripheral Vascular Procedures Volumes to 2021

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This report presents procedure volumes forecasts for some of the most common cardiovascular and peripheral vascular surgical procedures performed in the five EU countries of France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the UK (5EU). The forecast period covered by this report is for the years 2016 through 2021. This report also presents an overview of the etiology and epidemiology of selected cardiovascular and peripheral vascular diseases/disorders, prevailing surgical approaches/techniques, and evolving procedural utilization trends. Cardiovascular surgical procedures discussed include cardiac resynchronization therapy, congenital heart defect repair, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, implantation of implantable cardioverter defibrillators, pacemakers, and ventricular-assist devices, heart valve repair/replacement, percutaneous coronary intervention with or without stenting, thrombectomy/thrombolysis, and transmyocardial revascularization. Peripheral vascular interventional/surgical proce…

Buerger’s Disease, a chronic, inflammatory, obstructing tobacco-associated vasculopathy, can lead to tissue loss and major amputations of limbs.

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Buerger’s disease is a condition wherein the blood flow to the arteries is restricted due to the constant use of tobacco. Continuous smoking leads to peripheral vascular disease, loss of tissue and in major cases, amputations of the limbs explains vascular surgeon Dr S. Bala Kumar. Buerger’s disease is chronic, inflammatory, obstructing tobacco-associated vasculopathy found in small and medium-sized arteries. It is largely found in young smokers. The flow of blood supply to the arteries and adjacent nerves is affected due to constant use of tobacco products like cigarettes, cigars and beedis. Acute cases of Buerger’s disease result in tissue loss and major amputations of limbs. The incidence in India is between 77 per cent in males and 11 to 23 per cent in females.

The median age of diagnosis is 34 years. This disease is a relatively common cause of peripheral vascular disease in young people and a cause of disability in patients of all ages. It manifests with decreased blood supply in …